Messages of Aloha

#TeamTulsi

Messages of Aloha

Joan

Oregon

Love and compassion

Only love and compassion can heal this beautiful country!

Rpger

Maryland

My Dad

He was driving home from work. On this particular day, he saw a young trying to hitch a ride. The man was thin and did not look healthy. He stopped and offered him a ride. As they rode he asked the stranger where he was heading and it turned out to be an address not far from his own home. He said he could drive the man right to the address.

Then he asked why that address? Did he live there? The man said no. His sister lived there and he had a suicide note in his hand he was delivering.

As they drove the conversation focused on hope for the future. The driver offered to take him to his own house, give food and shelter and time to think things through. You see, the hitchhiker was a long time heroin addict that had given up on life.

As the hitchhiker slowly regained his strength he also slowly regained a purpose. He no longer wished to kill himself and became convinced through conversations and guided readings that he could start a new life and with help make it worthwhile.

That hitchhiker did go on and get married and found employment and make a good life.

That driver was my Dad.

Susan

Arizona

Feeling blessed

I am feeling blessed. I have a roof over my head, clothes on my back, and food on my table. It has not always been the food I like or the clothes I would choose or the living space I would prefer, but the Lord has always provided for me through my own efforts, the help of friends and my faith in the goodness of God. God bless America and all nations and folks inhabiting this world :)

Fred

Ohio

His legacy lives on

My friend, Bill, got in a fight with the school bully. He got shoved, fell and broke his neck. His family helped him work through being paralyzed, and he continued to attend school, college, and law school. Bill chose to help women who had been victims of domestic violence, to help them get divorced from their abusers. He also started several community organizations that helped house, feed and transport people. Bill ran for city council and became a leader on city sustainability efforts and environmental protection. He worked to divert development from strip malls on the edge of town to the core downtown retail district, an effort that has resulted in a thriving business district. Bill worked through the transportation organization that he helped set up to get a federal grant for revitalization. By bringing together diverse interests he was able to leverage the grant into a major downtown redevelopment plan that brought hundreds of thousands of dollars in investment and turned our downtown into a model for surrounding cities. Bill died from kidney failure, at home, with his family, but his legacy lives on in a successful food co-op, a successful housing co-op, a busy bus transportation hub, and a sustainability commission for the city. I would love to tell you more about it. Thanks!

Walter

Maine

Do to others as you would have others do to you

Do to others as you would have others do to you. We need to understand the needs and wants of others and communicate about that in positive ways. I thought that is what democracy is supposed to be about.

But it is now obvious that some of the very wealthy don't want to do that. They could but they don't. The use their wealth and power to help themselves without understanding the needs of others, not even trying to be fair. I guess this is called "free enterprise". The best competitors get more than their share. But some those who don't have the resources - or good health - to do very well do not believe that they are being treated fairly. Sometimes they get very angry and do something very violent. We need a better system than that. I grew up in a small village where I did feel that we could work together and be fair to each other. I think that Hawaii may be a small enough culture that many more can feel that way today.

Fred

Ohio

My Friend Bill

My friend, Bill, got in a fight with the school bully. He got shoved, fell and broke his neck. His family helped him work through being paralyzed, and he continued to attend school, college, and law school. Bill chose to help women who had been victims of domestic violence, to help them get divorced from their abusers. He also started several community organizations that helped house, feed and transport people.

Bill ran for city council and became a leader on city sustainability efforts and environmental protection. He worked to divert development from strip malls on the edge of town to the core downtown retail district, an effort that has resulted in a thriving business district. Bill worked through the transportation organization that he helped set up to get a federal grant for revitalization. By bringing together diverse interests he was able to leverage the grant into a major downtown redevelopment plan that brought hundreds of thousands of dollars in investment and turned our downtown into a model for surrounding cities.

Bill died from kidney failure, at home, with his family, but his legacy lives on in a successful food co-op, a successful housing co-op, a busy bus transportation hub, and a sustainability commission for the city. I would love to tell you more about it. Thanks!

Carol

Hawaii

Such an act of kindness

This will seem minor to most, but to me, it was such an act of aloha. I was buying water at a self-serve station. The machine took my only dollar and didn't give change nor water. I had a five, but the store wouldn't give me change. A woman watched this scene and generously gave me 90 cents in change for my three-gallon bottle. Such an act of kindness.

Janet

Hawaiʻi

Love each other enough to agree to disagree

I come from a very politically divided family. Some are Democrats and some are Republicans. We all feel strongly for and against, but it does not diminish our love for each other. When we get together or speak on the phone, politics is never a topic of discussion. We really can't say that we respect each others' views, but we love each other enough that we agree to disagree.

Mahalo for letting me share.
 

Monique

Bergen

There is no other way

I grew up in France, my mother and grandmother had left Nazi Germany for political reasons. There was war, I was 5 years old when it started. I knew fear, violence, and cruelty. I knew what was the Holocaust at 5, having friends that disappeared all of a sudden. I wore the yellow star with them because I thought it was pretty. My mother agreed. Never knew the difference between Jews and Christians. I still don't know at 82. Division and hatred will never win, it does exist, but I trust that with Aloha in our hearts we can overcome this plague. I saw my first American on 25 August 1944. (Paris Liberation day). He was like a God and from then on no American could do anything wrong. Let us hope that we come to our senses soon but hope is not enough, we MUST care for each other. There is NO other way.

ALOHA from the bottom of my heart.

Barbara

California

The return of warmth and kindness

I work at a gated community/golf course/nature preserve as an entry Gate host. I try every day to wave, smile, and greet everyone who enters be it an owner/member, gardener, construction worker, vendor, guest, etc.. I believe that everyone deserves courtesy, kindness, and a smile.

Last year, the property was highly threatened by the Sobranes Fire that started in Big Sur, CA. We were one of the basecamps for the over 5000 firefighters that were defending and fighting the fire. If anyone deserved a smile and a wave, it was these guys and gals.

One afternoon, I passed through a fire company with my greetings and sat back at the desk. I heard a knock on the door, turned around, and a young firefighter was standing there. I thought he might need something and asked if I could help. He reached out to ME and gave me a huge bear hug and thanked me for making their job brighter when I was on duty. I simply could not believe that my core belief in sharing smiles meant that much to the crews for one of them to reach out and return the warmth and kindness.

I have cried telling this experience to others because I felt that what I could give the firefighters was so small in comparison to them putting their lives on the line to save the homes and property. Except for the blessing of the birth of my two healthy sons and meeting my husband, this hug was the best gift I have ever received in my entire life.

Shane

Washington

I dream of Dr. King's vision becoming our reality

When I was in first grade, I was inspired by a reading assignment about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I was moved by his methods of nonviolence to bring about positive change. Later I would learn about others who moved me. Jackie Robinson, Bruce Lee, and so many others that fought the color of their outer self to show the beauty and strength of their inner self.

I find it frustrating in our modern world that people are still using skin color as a division point, some even trying to set back gains for equality that some people literally died to create. Not just those of "privilege" but minorities who seek to absent themselves from society because they don't feel "safe". I know the people who inspired me as a child did not worry about safety, but more about helping their fellow man. How can we say we honor these pioneers of equality if we throw away their gains? Until we embrace the concept of judging people by the content of their character, rather than the color of the vessel of their soul, we will not progress as humans. I have raised my sons that all humanity in its varied facets is a beautiful thing. The media needs to stop inciting divisive negativity and instead celebrate those who reach past their comfort zone to include others. The main political parties need to pull away from their extreme agendas and actually serving the varied need of their constituency.

If a little caucasian child can be inspired by reading about a brave black civil rights leader or a Chinese martial arts expert, why can't everyone? Why can we not all celebrate each other's differences rather than use them to divide and weaken us all?

I dream of the vision Dr. King becoming our reality. That would be my aloha.

Paula

New York

It is about caring about this country and all of its citizens

I don't know if this is what you are looking for but the very first thing that came to my mind when I heard about the shooting yesterday was: Was my Republican Congressman John Faso OK???Although I was very, very sad to hear that others had been injured, I felt a great sense of relief that Congressman Faso was OK. Even though we differ on a lot of political issues and I have protested often in front of his Congressional Office in regard to his stand on the House Healthcare Act, Environmental and other issues, he is first and foremost a member of my community.

Even though I don't know him really well personally, we both reside in the same town. We attend the same church. I am brought to the verge of tears even thinking about if he had been one of the victims in yesterday's incident. Just because you disagree with someone politically does not mean that you hate them whether they be the President, a congressional representative or whomever. I don't know where this thinking is coming from but it is very disturbing??? Does this mean I will stop making my voice heard if I disagree with Congressman Faso's stand on a particular bill? Absolutely not! That is what democracy is about!

His local Congressional office staff sees us there every week. They have gotten to know us. We talk about the weather, upcoming community events etc. in addition to when upcoming congressional votes on certain bills are expected to occur etc. His staff would actually probably start worrying about me and my fellow protestors if we never again called or showed up to protest or never again came into the office to fill out another form to express our views about the Congressman's stand on certain issues or bills ( both positive and negative).

It makes me sad when I hear that some people think that protesting or disagreeing with political views is about hatred when for me and I think most if not all of my fellow protestors, it is just the opposite. It is about caring about this country and all of its citizens very, very much. I know in my heart that Congressman Faso understands this. (If you know Congressman Faso and you see him in the House, maybe you can let him know that I am very, very grateful that he is OK! And I am very grateful that you are OK, too Congresswoman Gabbard!)

Paul

Massachusetts

Perhaps we could try something different

After a tragedy, it seems natural to want to assign blame and point fingers. Perhaps we could try something different this time, Instead of regarding one another with suspicion and contempt, let's take a very short look back to a time before this country became polarized. Many young people are growing up in Red or Blue states thinking it has always been this way, it hasn't, the color-coded states idea is only about 20 years old. Looking a little further back, how much difference was there between Dwight Eisenhower and John Kennedy? So just a little recent history tells us that the current predicament we find ourselves in is not some historical phenomenon etched in stone to be carried out generation after generation, If we allow ourselves to be manipulated into taking a divisive stand against our fellow citizens we will find ourselves promoting an agenda that will not benefit our families, our neighbors or our country at large. So maybe it's not too late to look back to a time before Red and Blue states, to a time of less animosity and more optimism. No one can do this alone, it will take all of us working for one goal, all in one direction, mutual success.

Brandon

Hawaii

Earning each other's trust

There was a young man walking down the road, minding his own business when a police officer pulled over and stopped him. The young man had never been in trouble with the law before besides a few traffic tickets and he certainly wasn't doing anything wrong when the officer stopped him. The officer had a bad attitude even though the young man was compliant and not disrespectful. He had already made up his mind that the young man was going to get charged with something no matter what so he told the man that he was under arrest for drug possession. The man very confused asked what are you talking about? I don't do drugs and I don't have drugs and the officer pulled out a bag of some form of illegal narcotics from his pocket. Why are you doing this? Asked the man. You know that wasn't mine. The day in court came and it was the officer's word against his and he went to jail. After about a year the man was finally free but he had lost his job, the bank repossessed his car and basically had just the clothes on his back.

Struggling to get back on his feet he applied for any job he could get. Luckily a restaurant hired him even though it was minimum wage it was better than nothing. His first day of work he sees another man working there that looks familiar. Then he realized that it was the officer that arrested him. He was quite angry at that point and wanted to confront him but at the same time, he didn't want to do something that he would later regret. After he cooled down a bit he went to the ex-officer and asked him why did you put me in jail? The officer with a deep look of regret on his face said "you know what, I have absolutely no excuse for what I did to you. I was a corrupt cop and after you were convicted, I got caught for planting evidence in another case, I got fired and did a few months in jail and now I'm here working minimum wage just as you are. I messed up both of our lives and all I can offer is my sincerest apology. I don't expect you to forgive me when I haven't yet forgiven myself for my careless stupidity." The man looked at him for a moment and said "I do forgive you. At this moment right now I have chosen to forgive you." After a time of working together and talking to each other here and there, earning each other's trust, they began to form a strong friendship and to this day they are best friends.

Barbara

Pennsylvania

We have to believe in ourselves

We have to believe in ourselves. We need to help people when they need help. We must listen to what people have to say. We need to give advice when needed. We must love one another. We have to learn from our mistakes that we make along the way. We need to be better and to be true to ourselves. We must do the right thing. We are supposed to be here for love, peace, kindness, understanding and giving out hope. We all need to be happy and healthy. Be strong and be happy.